Parental Rights in Florida

Resolution Supporting the PRA

We did it! Thanks in part to your support, Florida adopted a resolution calling on Congress to pass the Parental Rights Amendment. In 2011, Rep. Coley and Sen. Flores introduced HM 557/SM 954. The memorial passed both houses by an overwhelming majority. (Learn more about state resolutions.)

Florida Parental Rights News

Oklahoma House Chamber

Legislative Update and a Big Surprise

April 16, 2019

This legislative season has been something of a mixed bag, with some victories, some disappointments, some challenges, and one particular story that took us by surprise. Some Victories In Oklahoma, the Parental Rights Amendment (PRA) resolution, SCR 1, passed the House of Representatives by unanimous consent on April 3, making Oklahoma the seventh state to…

Past News Items:

2011 - We did it! Thanks in part to your support, Florida called on Congress to pass the Parental Rights Amendment. Rep. Coley and Sen. Flores introduced HM 557/SM 954, calling on Congress to pass the Parental Rights Amendment. The memorial passed both houses by an overwhelming majority.

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Volunteer in Florida

To volunteer in Florida, please contact Jim Sullivan.

Florida State Law and Parental Rights

At Risk

Florida does not have a state statute that explicitly defines and protects parental rights as fundamental rights.

Florida's Proceedings Relating to Children can be found here.

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Be sure to sign up for our newsletter to keep posted on parental rights in both your state and nationwide. Through our volunteer network, we monitor the law in all the states. We then pass on important updates and action items.

Florida Courts and Parental Rights

"Strict Scrutiny" Applied to Parental Rights

N.B. v. Florida Department of Children and Families (Florida 3rd District Court of Appeal, 2016):

"When a statute impinges on a fundamental liberty interest, such as parenting ones child, we must analyze the constitutionality of the statute under a strict scrutiny standard. Fla. Dep’t of Children & Families v. F.L., , 607 (Fla. 2004) 'To withstand strict scrutiny, a law must be necessary to promote a compelling governmental interest and must be narrowly tailored to advance that interest.' State v. J.P., 907 So. 2d1101, 1109 (Fla. 2004)."

However, this precedent is subject to change.